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Annual Vaccines & Tests

We offer the following vaccinations for our canine patients.  As Virginia state law dictates, we require the Rabies vaccine for all canines over the age of 4 months.

Rabies:  A viral disease that can affect all warm-blooded mammals, including dogs, cats, wildlife, farm animals, and humans.  The virus infects cells of the central nervous system, producing in-coordination and behavioral abnormalities.  Once signs of the Rabies virus appear, the disease is normally fatal.  The Rabies vaccine is good for either one year or three years depending on your dog's vaccine history.  The first that they receive at 16 weeks is good for a year and all subsequent vaccines are good for three years.

Distemper-Hepatitis-Parainfluenza-Parvovirus:  Canine Distemper is a widespread virus that causes high mortality in dogs. The virus infects various tissues in the dog's body, producing diarrhea, fever, nasal and ocular discharge, respiratory disease, appetite loss and neurologic signs suck as muscular spasms and paralysis.  The disease is easily transmitted and often fatal.  Infectious canine Hepatitis is caused by canine adenovirus type 1.  It infects a wide range of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, spleen and lungs.  Chronic hepatitis or severe illness may occur, including death.  Canine Parvovirus is a common, highly contagious and potentially fatal intestinal virus that causes severe, often bloody, diarrhea and vomiting.  The DHPP vaccine is started around 8 weeks of age and is given a total of 4 times, separated by 3-4 weeks each.  The first two vaccines are solely DHPP and the last two include the Leptospirosis component.

Leptospirosis:  Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection resulting from the contact with urine of infected wildlife, rodents, contaminated water or food.  The Leptospira bacteria can infect the kidneys and liver, where they can cause a variety of symptoms including fever, loss of appetite, depression, and generalized pain.  This particular disease is concerning as humans can also get Leptospirosis.  The Lepto vaccine is typically started around 12 weeks of age and given in conjunction with the DHPP vaccine for all puppies and should be boostered in 3-4 weeks.  The Lepto vaccine is continued as a yearly vaccine.

Lyme Disease:  Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium which is transmitted by ticks and leas to symptoms such as fever, lethargy, joint pain, and lameness.  The lameness can occasionally shift from one leg to another.  It also has the potential to cause more severe symptoms including kidney failure, heart and nervous system disease.  The Lyme vaccine can be given during the normal "puppy series" or can be given later in life.  The vaccine should be boostered in 3-4 weeks and then yearly.

Bordetella (Kennel Cough):  Kennel cough is an infectious respiratory disease which manifests with symptoms including coughing, lethargy, fever, and eye/nasal discharge.  Kennel cough is airborne and spread through contact with infected dogs.  We highly recommend this vaccine should your dog board in a kennel-type facility, go to a groomer, visit dog parks or frequently accompany you to locations that have multiple other unknown dogs.  The Bordetella vaccine is a series of two vaccines given 3-4 weeks apart.  The first is an oral vaccination and the second, or "booster" is an injectable vaccine.  The Bordetella vaccine is continued yearly until the pet is no longer at risk.

Canine Influenza:  Canine Influenza (CIV H3N2 & CIV H3N8) is also an infectious respiratory disease with symptoms including coughing, lethargy, fever, and eye/nasal discharge.  Canine Influenza is also airborne and spread through contact with infected dogs.  While not required by most boarding facilities, it is recommended to ensure your dog is protected.  The Canine Influenza vaccine is a series of two vaccines given 3-4 weeks apart, and then given yearly.

Heartworm/Lyme/Ehrlichia/Anaplasmosis blood test:  At their first annual examination, your pup will have blood drawn to check for Heartworms which is a deadly disease carried by mosquitoes.  This test will also check for infections of Lyme, Ehrlichia, Anaplasmosis which are three tick borne diseases prevalent in this area.  These three diseases can cause swollen and painful joints, lameness, lethargy, vomiting, and anorexia.

Fecal Ovum/Parasite test:  We recommend that a fecal sample be checked at the first puppy visit at 8 weeks, their final puppy visit at 16 weeks, and then yearly.  The fecal test checks for intestinal parasites, many of which can be spread to not only other pets in your household but also you and your children.  The fecal test also checks for Giardia.  All intestinal parasites can cause vomiting and diarrhea, as well as a "bloated" abdomen.  Severe infestations can cause lethargy, anorexia, pale mucous membranes and sometimes death.  Should your puppy have an intestinal parasite, it can easily be treated in the early stages with an oral dewormer and sometimes antibiotics if indicated.

We offer the following vaccinations for our feline patients.  As Virginia state law dictates, we require a Rabies vaccine for all feline over the age of 4 months.

Rabies:   A viral disease that can affect all warm blooded mammals, including dogs, cats, wildlife, farm animals, and humans.  The virus infects cells of the central nervous system, producing in-coordination and behavioral abnormalities.  Once signs of the Rabies virus appear, the disease is normally fatal.  The Rabies vaccine should be administered at 16 weeks of age and is good for one year.  We carry the Merial "PureVax" Rabies vaccine which is good for one year, as well as the Merial "Imrab3" Rabies vaccine which is good for three years.  We strongly recommend the "PureVax" vaccine due to the decreased possibility of a vaccine site sarcoma as it is nonadjuvanted vaccine.  At the first yearly visit, you have the option of receiving either a one year or three year vaccine. 

Feline Rhinotracheitis-Calicivirus-Panleukopenia:  Infectious upper respiratory infections are very common in cats. There are a number of infectious agents that can cause and/or contribute to these infections. Two of the most common causes are viruses -- feline viral rhinotracheitis (feline herpesvirus, type 1) and feline calicivirus. Because upper respiratory infections are so common in cats, many pet owners know that the signs include fever, sneezing, runny nose, and loss of appetite. A rather large percentage of cats can become carriers of feline herpesvirus and/or feline calicivirus after they clinically recover from infection. These cats may appear clinically normal, but the virus can become reactivated (and the cat can develop clinical signs again) after some type of stressful event.  The feline panleukopenia virus is a parvovirus. It is found worldwide and is very contagious for cats and some other animals. Panleukopenia is spread when a cat or kitten comes in contact with the virus from an infected animal's feces or other secretions. It can even be spread through contact with items (including bedding, food dishes, and a person's clothing) contaminated by an infected animal. The virus is very resistant and can survive in the environment for long periods of time. Once a cat becomes infected, signs can include lethargy, fever, loss of appetite, frequent vomiting, and sometimes death. Kittens tend to be the most severely affected.  The FVRCP vaccine is started at 8 weeks of age for all kittens and should be given three times, 3-4 weeks apart.  The vaccine is given again in a year and is good for one year, then after is good for three years.

Feline Leukemia:  Feline Leukemia occurs worldwide and is a very serious infection in cats. The infection is primarily spread through the saliva or urine of an infected cat following direct contact - mutual grooming, shared food bowls and litter boxes, and less commonly bite wounds. Kittens are especially vulnerable, and can contract the infection before or after birth from an infected mother. Persistently infected cats can appear healthy for extended periods of time before showing signs of illness. The virus attacks the cat's immune system, leading to immune suppression, increased risk of certain cancers, and bone marrow suppression.  The Feline Leukemia vaccine is a series of two vaccines given 3-4 weeks apart, and then boostered yearly.  

Fecal Ovum/Parasite test:  We recommend that a fecal sample be checked at the first kitten visit at 8 weeks, their final kitten visit at 16 weeks, and then yearly.  The fecal test checks for intestinal parasites, many of which can be spread to not only other pets in your household but also you and your children.  The fecal test also checks for Giardia.  All intestinal parasites can cause vomiting and diarrhea, as well as a "bloated" abdomen.  Severe infestations can cause lethargy, anorexia, pale mucous membranes and sometimes death.  Should your kitten have an intestinal parasite, it can easily be treated in the early stages with an oral or injectable dewormer and sometimes antibiotics if indicated.

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Location

8301 Seminole Trail, Ruckersville, VA. 22968

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

RUCKERSVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL

Monday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

7:00 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed